Regulatory temper tantrum in PA

April 11, 2016 • Nadia Steinzor

Oil and gas companies often complain about “overly burdensome” and “redundant” regulations that reduce efficiency and increase costs. In Pennsylvania, drillers are going one big step further—making it clear that they really don’t want to be regulated at all. 

Some state legislators are working to derail the adoption of revised regulations for well sites. They’ve tried (though so so far failed) to prohibit rules for conventional drillers by amending the fiscal code. Now they’re pushing for the House and Senate to pass concurrent resolutions disapproving of the regulations, thereby stalling the adoption of Chapter 78, and potentially also of revised rules for unconventional (Marcellus Shale) drilling, known as Chapter 78a. This latest move could come as early as April 12, when the House and Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committees meet.  

Test the air, get answers for frontline communities

March 2, 2016 • Nadia Steinzor

Every day, an average adult takes about 20,000 breaths to get the oxygen needed for survival. Unfortunately, for the growing number of people living near oil and gas development, that many breaths also provides ample opportunities to take in health-harming pollution. 

The shale boom of the last several years has intensified drilling in many places and introduced it in others, adding onto previous drilling and bringing the number of active oil and gas wells nationwide to 1.1 million in 2014. 

No wonder oil and gas field residents keep asking basic questions: “What’s in my air?” and "Why is it making me sick?” Yet both the regulators who oversee the oil and gas industry and the policymakers who determine its course respond only with partial, ambiguous answers. They don’t regularly monitor the air directly around well sites and facilities, accurately track the emissions generated, or use the right health standards to judge risks to residents.

Proposed methane rule could protect Pennsylvanians’ health and climate

January 21, 2016 • Nadia Steinzor

Pennsylvania officials often boast about having the second highest natural gas producing state in the nation, usually while playing up purported economic benefits and downplaying documented environmental impacts. But this week, the ranking was invoked as the reason to stem pollution caused by oil and gas operations.

Governor Wolf's Administration announced a new plan to o reduce methane pollution from fracking and fracking-related development, including gas wells and processing and transmission facilities. At 87 times more potent than carbon dioxide over a 20-year time period, methane—the primary component of natural gas—is a major driver of climate change. In 2014, Pennsylvania’s oil and gas producers reported wasting nearly 100,000 metric tons of methane, or enough natural gas to heat nearly 65,000 homes

Fiscal Fiasco in Pennsylvania

December 15, 2015 • Nadia Steinzor

The Pennsylvania General Assembly is being downright subversive. Not in the sense of resisting injustice or speaking truth to power, but by subverting the democratic process. 

Late last week, the Senate voted 48-2 to pass the latest version of the fiscal code, the bill that implements the state budget. The House could vote to pass the same bill this week. Legislators have packed the fiscal code with provisions that would never survive as stand-alone bills, avoiding debate and public scrutiny. While the tactic isn’t new, it’s a blatant example of “backdoor” governance and an attempt to usurp the authority of government agencies. It may even be unconstitutional. 

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The short memory of Pennsylvania’s fracking regulators

October 28, 2015 • Nadia Steinzor

The phrase “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it” is often used when talking about war or major social conflicts. But last week, John Quigley, Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), seemed to be committing the same mistake.

In commenting to a reporter about water supply problems in the Woodlands area of Butler County, Quigley said,  “I don't think it would be a productive use of my time to review how the agency handled certain cases…I'm much more interested in ongoing instances of pollution of the waterways of the commonwealth.” 

Darkness in the Sunshine State

August 10, 2015 • Nadia Steinzor

First they dreamed of building a city, now they dream of drilling for oil. The Kanter family, aka real estate moguls of southern Florida, that is. And the location they have in mind is the acreage they own in the Everglades—a unique natural environment deemed globally significant because of its diverse wildlife, vegetation, and ecosystems.

Not the Way to Go, Ohio

July 31, 2015 • Nadia Steinzor

Every road trip needs a good theme song. A recent excursion for Earthworks’ Citizens Empowerment Project brought The Pretenders to mind:

I went back to Ohio, but my pretty countryside 

Had been paved down the middle, by a government that had no pride

The farms of Ohio has been replaced by shopping malls

Said A, O, Oh way to go Ohio…

If it walks and talks like a duck…Time to stop NY frack waste!

June 3, 2015 • Nadia Steinzor

For several years, New York made headlines by continuing to delay (and delay…) the decision whether to allow shale gas development. Then the state made history last December by saying no because the risks to health and the environment were too great. 

Yet it’s impossible to escape the reach of the national shale gas and oil boom. Even with a prohibition on production, New York has to wrestle with a growing stream of waste coming across state borders (as well as an expanding spider web of infrastructure and oil trains).